Safety

FOR YOUR SAFETY 

At Sunburst, safety is paramount to having a good time and keeping our operations running smoothly. We know that our guests are excited to experience the thrill of the hill—and we can’t wait to show you the slopes! To ensure everyone is safe and our environment is maintained, we ask that all guests abide by the following snowboarding and skiing safety policies.

WAIVERS

A blue hill at sunburst.

COLOR CODE

Hills and Lifts

Before you head out on the hill, make sure you know which level you fit into. And be honest with yourself. Sunburst has terrain groomed for all skill levels, so look for your color-coded signs and have an awesome time!

  • Green circle: Beginners welcome. These “easy” runs offer smooth slopes of a gentle to moderate slope gradient.
  • Blue square: If you’re confident picking up the pace and have your turning and stopping down, these “intermediate” hills are for you.
  • Orange oval: Jetting off to do some freestyle skiing or snowboarding? The terrain parks are where you’ll find professionally carved jumps and moguls.
  • Black diamond: Fast skiers and snowboarders with excellent control like to challenge themselves on these “difficult” runs.

Skiers and snowboarders should be advised that the green circle, blue square, and black diamond are ratings relative for Sunburst only and not the same as other areas. Chairlifts do not service beginner terrain.
OUR HILLS

A person skiing downhill.

SEVEN POINTS TO YOUR RESPONSIBILITY CODE

  1. Always stay in control, and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.
  2. People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.
  3. You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
  4. Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
  5. Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  6. Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.
  7. Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.

Protect yourself, protect others. With common sense and the seven points of Your Responsibility Code, you can have a safer day on the slopes.

RESPONSIBILITY CODE

A skier riding the ski lift at sunburst.

PRACTICE RESPONSIBLE LIFT USE

Using and riding chair lifts in a responsible manner is one of the primary safety considerations for all skiers and snowboarders. It’s your responsibility to know how to use and ride the lift safely.

Lift Tips

  • Need assistance? Ask the lift attendant for help
  • Remove & carry packs. Children in packs are not allowed on chairlifts at Sunburst
  • Do not use phones, music, or games while loading or unloading
  • It is ok to miss a chair and wait for the next one
  • When loading, watch for the approaching chair and then sit to the back once seated
  • Drop something? Let it fall. Any item dropped can be picked up later
  • Absolutely no horseplay on the lifts
A snowboarder doing a jump in the terrain park.

TERRAIN PARK

How to Make the Most of it

Sunburst has the most diverse terrain of any ski and snowboarding hill around. Just ask our diehards—if you can ski at Sunburst, you can ski anywhere in the world. The same goes for snowboarding. Here are some best practices for making the most out of our adventurous terrain.

  • Make a plan. Every time you use freestyle terrain, make a plan for each feature you want to use. Your speed, approach and takeoff will directly affect your maneuver and landing.
  • Look before you leap. Scope around the jumps first, not over them. Know your landings are clear, and clear yourself out of the landing area.
  • Easy style it. Start small and work your way up. (Inverted aerials are not recommended.)
  • Respect your fellow riders. Yield to the person in front of you, stay out of the way, and just be cool. This goes for the lift line, too.
Two people skiing together downhill.

CODE OF CONDUCT

Don’t be “That Dude”

Everyone knows “that dude” on the ski hill. The knucklehead is only focused on their own experience, regardless if it interferes with the good time or safety of others. At Sunburst, we practice old-school etiquette. In order not to be “that dude,” simply follow these simple rules.

  • Yield. The people in front of you always have the right of way. Whenever skiing or snowboarding downhill or merging, look uphill and yield.
  • Go around. If there are boards or skis in front of a jump, the jump is closed.
  • Stay in your lane. The cool thing about collisions and even close calls is that they’re 100% avoidable. Just stay in your lane and be aware of your surroundings.
  • Brake. Most modern alpine ski bindings have “brakes” built-in, whereas snowboards or telemark skis often have a leash. Use these tools to help prevent runaway equipment.
  • Stop in a safe place. This means no parking it in the middle of a trail, or where you aren’t visible from above. Be fair to the uphill skier or snowboarder and make sure they can see you.
  • Stay in control. Knowing how to properly start, stop, and keep your cool is a prerequisite to hitting the slopes. If you need help, our Ski School instructors are happy to hook you up with some lessons!
  • Read the signs. Signs are your friend. They’re posted along the trails to help you find your way and stay out of danger. Read ‘em and heed ‘em.
  • Know the lifts. In addition to knowing where the lift is going, you must know how to load, ride, and unload safely without hopping on. And if you need help, just ask the friendly lift operator. Each lift is marked by a green circle, blue square, or black diamond.
  • Be nice. It keeps you warm. The hill is a high-adrenaline, fast-paced environment where all kinds of people come to have an awesome winter experience. Be kind to all riders, especially noobs (you were once one, too) and ski school groups, and this one’s a big one: be nice to the Sunburst staff and lift operators. They grind hard to make this all happen for you.
A row of skis.

HELMETS AND GEAR

Protect your Noggin

Sunburst, as well as the National Ski Association (NSA), encourage all skiers and snowboarders to wear a helmet. In addition to protecting against severe head injuries and concussions, helmets will also guard against small bumps and bruises from tree branches and other terrain. While helmets are a rad piece of protective gear—and ridiculously fashionable—it’s important to remember that they are not the end-all-be-all of safety out on the hill. A rider’s behavior will have as much impact on the safety of the sport as any piece of protective equipment.

A sunburst employee making snow.

NO DRONE ZONE

No drones. No exceptions.

If you’re jonesing for some light reading, however, you can check out our official policy below.

Out of safety concerns for guests, employees, and resort property, as well as concerns for individual privacy, Sunburst Ski Area prohibits the operation or use of unmanned aerial systems, or drones, by the general public–including recreational users and hobbyists–without the prior written authorization from the Resort.This prohibition includes drones used for filming or videotaping, as well as any drone use by media or journalists operating above or within Sunburst Ski Area boundaries. This prohibition on drone operations or use extends to any drones launched or operated from Resort property, as well as drones launched from private property outside of the Resort boundaries. Please contact a resort representative at 262-626-8404, if you have any questions or if you seek prior authorization to operate any aerial drones. Any authorized operation of aerial drones may be governed by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rules and regulations, local law enforcement, [and/or U.S. Forest Service rules], as well as those policies separately established by this Resort, which may include certification, training, insurance coverage, indemnification requirements, and waivers or releases of liability. Any violation of this policy may involve suspension of your skiing or snowboarding privileges, or the revocation of your season pass, as well as confiscation of any drone equipment, and may subject violators to any damages, including, but not limited to, damages for violations of privacy and/or physical or personal injuries or property damage, as well as regulatory fines and legal fees.